Läsarkommentarer

Georgia GOP candidates stay focused on guns, immigration

032 573 75 87 Larue Mannix (2020-09-11)


ATLANTA (AP) - With just five days to go before Georgia's primary, the five Republican candidates for governor hardly mentioned topics like education and job creation during a debate Thursday night. It was all about guns and immigration.

Since they largely agree on those issues from a policy standpoint, each one spent the night selling themselves as tougher than the rest, more likely to crack down on people in the country illegally and prevent any restriction on gun rights.

Presidential politics also featured in the discussion, 70-346 dumps as each one presented himself as the biggest ally of Donald Trump.

Georgia Republican gubernatorial candidates Casey Cagle, from left to right, listens to a rebuttal from Hunter Hill, as Brian Kemp, Clay Tippins, and Michael Williams look on during a debate, Thursday, May 17, 2018, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Amis)

As the front-runner in a race that could likely be decided in a runoff, Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle was attacked the most.

Hunter Hill, a former state Senator from the Atlanta area, questioned Cagle's support for a religious liberty bill that floundered in this year's legislature. Secretary of State Brian Kemp of Athens questioned the source of Cagle's personal wealth, without offering any proof of wrongdoing.

Cagle pushed back, expressing full support for religious liberties legislation and saying that no one needed to question where his income came from, because he has filed financial disclosure forms every year.

Clay Tippins of Atlanta earned a scolding by the moderator when he ignored the format for a moment to decry "career politicians," and directly addressed "the people of Georgia," asking "Will you stand with me?"

State Sen. Michael Williams tried to cast doubt on Kemp's support of Trump, while Kemp expressed full support for the president in a rebuttal.

Cagle questioned Hill's record as a candidate for his relatively liberal Atlanta-area senate district, saying he flipped on conservative issues. Hill protested, touting his pro-life and pro-gun stances.

Georgia Republican gubernatorial candidate Casey Cagle, left, speaks as fellow candidate Hunter Hill listens during a debate Thursday, May 17, 2018, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Amis)

Georgia Republican gubernatorial candidate Michael Williams, right, speaks to candidate Brian Kemp, left, as fellow candidate Clay Tippins looks at notes during a debate Thursday, May 17, 2018, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Amis)

Georgia Republican gubernatorial candidate Clay Tippins, right, listens to fellow candidate Brian Kemp address him as Hunter Hill, left, looks on during a debate Thursday, May 17, 2018, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Amis)

Georgia Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp, center, speaks while flanked by fellow candidates Hunter Hill, left, and Clay Tippins, right, during a debate Thursday, May 17, 2018, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Amis)

Georgia Republican gubernatorial candidate Clay Tippins, center, speaks while flanked by fellow candidates Brian Kemp, left, and Michael Williams, right, during a debate Thursday, May 17, 2018, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Amis)

Georgia Republican gubernatorial candidates Michael Williams, right, speaks as, from left to right, Hunter Hill, Brian Kemp, Clay Tippins listen during a debate Thursday, May 17, 2018, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Amis)

Georgia Republican gubernatorial candidates Brian Kemp, center, listens to Hunter Hill, left, as Clay Tippins, right, looks on during a debate Thursday, May 17, 2018, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Amis)

From left to right, Georgia Republican gubernatorial candidates Casey Cagle, Hunter Hill, Brian Kemp, Clay Tippins and Michael Williams wait to debate Thursday, May 17, 2018, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Amis)

Advertisement

© Socialmedicinsk tidskrift. All rights reserved!